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Paul Piatkowski
336-731-8431 ext. 8578
Planning Period: Third Period (11:19-1:24)
F.D. Picture
Daily Schedule
 
Spring 2022
 
Period 1: English III Honors
Period 2: English III Honors
Period 3: English II (w/Mr. Snyder)
Period 4: AP English Language and Composition
 
Meet the Teacher:
My name is Paul Piatkowski. I received a BS in English Education from Appalachian State University, an MA in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and am currently a candidate for the PhD at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. I have been teaching English at North Davidson High School since 2004 and have taught English I, English II, English III, English III Honors, AP English Language and Composition, English IV, English IV Honors, and AP Seminar (the first class in the AP Capstone Program). I have taught ACT preparatory courses for the Princeton Review/ASPIRE program here in Davidson County. I serve as a facilitator with the North Carolina AP Partnership (NCAPP) for AP English Language and Composition. I have been a reader for the College Board for the AP English Language and Composition exam for several years. I had the honor of representing North Davidson and subsequently for all of Davidson County Schools in the 2010-2011 school year as Teacher of the Year. 
 
Professional Publications:
“The Alien in the Graveyard: Extraterrestrial Reanimation in Ed Wood’s Plan 9 from Outer Space and Walter Mosley’s The Wave,” Revenge of the Remakes: Adaptations and the Influence of 1950s Sci-Fi, McFarland Press, Edited by Dennis Cutchins and Dennis Perry, (Forthcoming).
 
"War of the Worlds: Geologic Consciousness in Reza Negarestani's Cyclonopedia," Journal of Science Fiction, vol. 4, no. 2, 2021.
 
“Deterritorializing the Textual Site in the Digital Age: Paratextual and Narrative Democracy in Mark Z. Danielewski’s Only Revolutions,” Journal of Modern Literature, vol. 43, no, 1, 2019.

“Ghost Parrot(ing): Re/Deconstructing Order through Psychic Mimesis, Revenge Justice, and Conjuration in Thomas Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy,” Intertexts, vol. 20, no. 2, 2018.
 
“Mind Inside Matter: The Physics of Interface in William Gibson’s The Peripheral”, Critique, vol. 60, no. 1, 2018.
 
General Information for the 2021-2022 School Year:
Due to the pandemic and our current state of schools, all platforms can initially be accessed through the Canvas platform. Students can expect to springboard from Canvas to such supplemental platforms as Noredink, Commonlit, AP Classroom, and Google Classroom. Students or parents are always welcome to connect with me via email, Remind messaging, or through calling me at my school telephone number, 336-731-8431 ext. 8578.  
 
Course Information: English IV Honors (Western European)
 
Course Description
 
“To become college and career ready, students must grapple with works of exceptional craft and thought whose range extends across genres, cultures, and centuries. Such works offer profound insights into the human condition and serve as models for students’ own thinking and writing. Along with high-quality contemporary works, these texts should be chosen from among seminal U.S. documents, the classics of American literature, and the timeless dramas of Shakespeare. Through wide and deep reading of literature and literary nonfiction of steadily increasing sophistication, students gain a reservoir of literary and cultural knowledge, references, and images; the ability to evaluate intricate arguments; and the capacity to surmount the challenges posed by complex texts” (CCSS).
 
English IV completes the global perspective initiated in English II. Though its focus is on European (Western, Southern, Northern) literature, this course includes important U.S. documents and literature (texts influenced by European philosophy or action).
 
This course is designed to further communication and cognition abilities of students through a growing development in reading, writing, and speaking skills. Essential skills for any pursuance of further education will be taught such as how to “[w]rite arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.” (CCSS, ELA Writing)
 
Grading Scale
 
Within each category, different assignments will be assigned different point values (10, 20, 50, 100) depending on size and difficulty. (A reading comprehension practice may be a ten point assignment, whereas a quiz may be worth 50 points--though both count as minor grades.)
 
Quarterly Percentage Breakdown
60% Major Assignments (Tests, Essays, Projects)
40% Minor Assignments (Worksheets, Quizzes, Minor Activities)
 
Semester Percentage Breakdown
40% First Quarter Average
40% Second Quarter Average
20% Final Exam (NCFE)
 
Numerical Score to Letter Grade Conversion
90-100 A
80-89 B
70-79 C
60-69 D
<59 F
 
English III Honors (American Literature)
 
Course Description
 
“To become college and career ready, students must grapple with works of exceptional craft and thought whose range extends across genres, cultures, and centuries. Such works offer profound insights into the human condition and serve as models for students’ own thinking and writing. Along with high-quality contemporary works, these texts should be chosen from among seminal U.S. documents, the classics of American literature, and the timeless dramas of Shakespeare. Through wide and deep reading of literature and literary nonfiction of steadily increasing sophistication, students gain a reservoir of literary and cultural knowledge, references, and images; the ability to evaluate intricate arguments; and the capacity to surmount the challenges posed by complex texts” (CCSS).
 
English III reinforces the global perspective initiated in English II through an American lens. Though its focus is on American literature, this course not only includes important U.S. documents and literature, but also influentail European philosophy and texts.
 
This course is designed to further communication and cognition abilities of students through a growing development in reading, writing, and speaking skills. Essential skills for any pursuance of further education will be taught such as how to “[w]rite arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.” (CCSS, ELA Writing)
 
Grading Scale
This course follows the basic setup established by Davidson County Schools' grading guidelines. 
 
Quarterly Percentage Breakdown
 
60% Major Assignments (Tests, Essays, Projects)
40% Minor Assignments (Worksheets, Quizzes, Minor Activities)
 
Semester Percentage Breakdown
 
40% First Quarter Average
40% Second Quarter Average
20% Final Exam (NCFE)
 
Numerical Score to Letter Grade Conversion
 
90-100 A
80-89 B
70-79 C
60-69 D
<59 F
 
AP Language and Composition
 
Description
 
The subject matter and goals of the AP English Language and Composition course are tantamount to those of a first-year college composition course: there is an emphasis on the expository, analytical, and argumentative that forms the basis of both academic and professional communication in addition to personal and reflective writing that nurtures the development of the student’s writing facility in any context; the students learn that the expository, analytical, and argumentative writing will become integral to their college education and is rooted in primary and secondary reading sources that students are taught to synthesize from in their own compositions and to cite these sources using conventions recommended by Modern Language Association (MLA) .

The purpose of this course is to help students “write effectively and confidently in their college courses across the curriculum and in their professional and personal lives.” (The College Board, AP English Course Description, p. 6). The course is organized according to the requirements and guidelines of the AP English Course Description. Students will also cover the North Carolina English III Curriculum.
 
Grading Scale
 
All grades in this course use percentages and will be graded as such. Students will also be provided with AP essay reader scores to better understand the way their essays will be reviewed by college board.
 
Percentage Breakdown
70% Major: Tests, Essays, Projects
30% Minor: Daily Work, Group Activities, Homework, Blogs, Quizzes
 
Combination Course Breakdown
20% Quarter One, 20% Quarter Two, 20% Quarter Three, 20% Quarter Four, 20% Final Exam (Can be Exempted)
 
Block Course Breakdown
40% Quarter One, 40% Quarter Two, 20% Final Exam (Can be Exempted
 
Numerical Score to Letter Grade Conversion
90-100 A
80-89 B
70-79 C
60-69 D
<59 F
 
General Classroom Procedures

Late work will ONLY be accepted if a student was absent. If a student is absent they will have five days to make up the work. After the fifth day it will not be accepted.

Projects and large papers are expected on the day due whether student is present or not. If a student is absent then arrangements must be made with the instructor beforehand or on the day due.
 
Here is the link to apply for the ASPIRE Course:
 
CURRENTLY NOT BEING OFFERED IN DCS
 
 www.go.ncsu.edu/aspire
Click on the following form link to submit your creative work to Quill and Ink.
 
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScrhqMB-fLJY5YOmcp0ZX_anIw9KmBNJx-VTrMUpWlPKg99JA/viewform?usp=pp_url